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The Coromandel Heritage Trust was formed in 2003 to establish THE TREASURY, a purpose-built archive and family history centre in Thames, New Zealand. The Treasury preserves and promotes the history and stories of the people in the Thames, Coromandel & Hauraki region - a region which played such a big part in the early development of New Zealand.

The Treasury houses an ever-growing collection of resources relating to the early history of Thames and the entire Coromandel Region. For the historical researcher, we have a large collection of history books and historical manuscripts as well as many resources to help research your family history, such as newspapers, magazines, photographs, Jubilee books, family records and certificates.

THE TREASURY IS OPEN FOR VISITORS AND RESEARCHERS.

OPEN: 11.00am - 3.00pm Monday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.

EXCEPT: Public holidays, and between Xmas & New Year.

The Treasury,
705 - 709 Queen Street,
Thames.

Phone (07) 868 8827 (during opening hours only)
Email:The Treasury

SEARCH THE TREASURY WEBSITE:
Google Web TheTreasury.org.nz
facebook

NZ HERITAGE TV SHOW COMES TO THE THAMES HISTORICAL MUSEUM

During a busy week in December, a number of The Treasury volunteers were interviewed by a TV company called TOP SHELF PRODUCTIONS for a TV show about various aspects of the history of Thames. Watch your TV screens over the next few months for the final production.
*** PRESS RELEASE ***
16 November 2015: Top Shelf Productions are working on a brand new factual TV series about revitalising small town museums and historical sites around New Zealand. The series will screen on Choice TV next year. There are more than 500 heritage sites and museums in New Zealand with over ninety percent of them in desperate need of help. Usually run by local volunteers, these caretakers of our history are not only struggling for funds, but struggling to get people to see their exhibits. The show's presenter will visit these small towns and with support from the local community, they will help revitalise each site’s collections and reveal some of New Zealand’s most fascinating forgotten stories and treasures. Top Shelf will be coming to Thames Historical Museum to help work collectively on an exciting new exhibit. This will be a display for Ted Egan’s beautifully carved scale model collection of early Thames buildings. Some of the buildings in the collection are: Royal Hotel, Phoenix Brewery, Old Court House, Scrip Corner, James Mackay’s House and Hansen’s Haunted House
To see Ted Egan's wonderful collection of kauri models of the historical buildings of Thames, some of which no longer exist, visit the new gallery at the Thames Historical Museum.

See HAURAKI HERALD FRIDAY DECEMBER 31st 2015

TRUE TALES OF THE COROMANDEL'S EASTERN SEABOARD


Our new book: True Tales of The Coromandel’s Eastern Seaboard has now been published. This book is the first of several in a heritage project organized by The Coromandel Heritage Trust (TCHT): collecting the stories that might otherwise be lost. These wonderful stories that have been passed down to us reflect the oral history of the families and communities of the Coromandel Peninsula.

The area covered by True Tales of The Coromandel’s Eastern Seaboard stretches from Whiritoa in the South, to Matarangi in the North. Collected since Labour Weekend 2014, it is a gathering of very special tales of the coast and the communities of Whangamata, Opoutere, Pauanui, Tairua, Te Karo, Hahei, Whitianga and up to Kennedy’s Bay.

Sixty-four tales have been contributed to True Tales of The Coromandel’s Eastern Seaboard by a number of people. Stories shared include one about a special fishing lure found, shipwreck stories, growing up in Tairua, Hahei and Whangamata, camping at Pauanui before settlement, road surveying, diving off the coast, memories of building the bach, surfing the coast and even Slipper Island. These tales are not about or by the rich or famous but about the stories of many of us who have experienced the Eastern Seaboard Coromandel Peninsula by living here.

Copies are available from The Treasury and selected bookshops in the Coromandel: cost $35 plus postage. All proceeds go to the cost of printing and the on-going running expenses of The Treasury.

HAURAKI HERALD FRIDAY DECEMBER 18th 2015

THE NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS' HERITAGE AWARD RECIPIENT

On 30th October 2015, the New Zealand Institute of Architects held their annual awards night to recognise the best of the year’s designs in various different categories. The Treasury Archive was awarded one of two Heritage Awards with Lopdell House in Titirangi receiving the other. In our case, the panel of judges considered in particular how a modern building sat against a heritage building, the points of reference in the modern design to the older building, and the standard of the construction.

In awarding a Heritage Award to THE TREASURY ARCHIVE, part of the award citation stated:

'[the design] resulted in a fine piece of civic architecture and a handsome stretch of streetscape. …'

'the project is a textbook take on Edwardian and twenty-first century ornamentation; although very different, the buildings look like they’re made for each other …'

'It is heartening to see Thames’s architectural heritage honoured in this way, and credit must go to clients who had the vision to begin this project and the persistence to see it through.'


THE TREASURY IS A NATIONAL TREASURE STANDING PROUD IN THAMES Waikato Times 19 November 2015.

A recent article in ARCHITECTURENOW entitled TREASURY RESEARCH CENTRE AND ARCHIVE by Justine Harvey and image by Simon Devitt begins:

'The symmetry and rhythms of the historic façade are replicated in the new building's design.'

'TS Eliot wrote in his poem BURNT NORTEN:
Time present and time past,
Are both perhaps present in time future,
And time future contained in time past.'

VISIT THE NEWLY UPDATED WEBSITE

Ohinemuri

Exploring our historic and natural heritage literature


This extensive website features: And much more!

THE TREASURY INDEX AND RESEARCH SERVICE IS AVAILABLE ONLINE

Research

ALSO TREASURY PUBLICATIONS ARE FOR SALE AND AVAILABLE TO ORDER ONLINE

Shop

JOIN THE COROMANDEL HERITAGE TRUST

We encourage everyone, near and far, to join as a member of the Trust and to be a part of this great effort to preserve our heritage. Our running costs are ongoing and, since we do not receive any regular funding, we are dependant on entry fees, subscriptions and donations to cover them. To become a member, download an application form, fill it out and send it together with your subscription to The Coromandel Heritage Trust, PO Box 75, Thames 3540, New Zealand. A special Trust newsletter called Footprints will then keep you abreast of all the new developments and the many ways in which you could help.

A BRAND NEW PUBLICATION FROM THE TREASURY NOW FOR SALE

FROM GOLD MINE TO FIRING LINE
'THE THAMES' AND THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 1918.

Althea Barker, Meghan Hawkes, Kae Lewis, David Wilton, Russell Skeet, Roger Strong & Tracey Spence, all members of the Coromandel Heritage Trust (The Treasury) have written a book to commemorate the people from the Thames region who went to war, the families they left behind, and in particular the service men who did not return. This magnificent book is a great tribute to the people of the Thames region. Over 300 pages long and with many photographs, it is an excellent read.
A limited number of the first edition are now for sale at $50 a copy from The Treasury bookshop and can be ordered online. Email The Coromandel Heritage Trust or post to: The Treasury Publications, The Coromandel Heritage Trust, PO Box 75, Thames 3540, New Zealand. You will be advised of the total cost and how to make payment. Postage and packaging is additional.


Also read many articles in THE TREASURY JOURNAL and
OUR PEOPLE about the Thames experience in WWI including:

GALLIPOLI; IN THEIR OWN WORDS. by Eber Johnston, Arthur Phillips, Tom Gemming, Walter Greenslade and Harry Keesing.


Eber Johnston

Thomas Gemming

Walter Greenslade

Huke Royal

Herbert Ayling

Leslie Darrow

William Flower

Jack Gemming

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

THAMES NOW HAS A 'ROLLING MEMORIAL' TO SIGNIFY THOSE THAT MADE THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE 100 YEARS AGO.


Click to enlarge the photo.

Commemoration ceremonies for the Gallipoli Campaign in 2015 to the Armistice celebrations in 2018 will continue for the next four years.



In conjunction with the New Zealand-wide WW100 project, The Treasury is making a special effort to collect records and stories of Thames, Coromandel and Hauraki WWI soldiers, doctors and nurses. If you can help us with any photos, written records and stories, letters home, telegrams, diaries, certificates, plaques, or mementoes of any of our World War I heroes, we would be delighted to hear from you.



The World War I Experience in Thames/Coromandel/Hauraki



History of the Carnegie Free Library in Thames

The original foundation stone for The Carnegie Free Library was laid in 1905 by James McGowan, the Minister of Mines and Justice. Andrew Carnegie was a United States steel magnate and philanthropist who contributed £2000 to build a library for the people of Thames. The contractor, J Fyfe and Sons built the Library for £1964. It was one of only three remaining Carnegie Libraries in New Zealand when it last closed its doors in 1990.
Click to enlarge the photo.
The Honorable J. McGowan (Minister for Mines) laying the foundations stone for
the new Carnegie Free Public Library at a ceremony on 6th April 1905.
Opening Ceremony for the Carnegie Free Library:
The Mayor (Mr A. Burns) addressing the assemblage, Nov 2, 1905.
From the Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-1905-11-5.
©The content of the entire Treasury website is copyright to The Coromandel Heritage Trust and not for reproduction on any other website.



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